Never Too Young: Potty Training a Golden Retriever Puppy

No dog owner wants to have smelly messes lying around the house. Therefore, it is important to potty train your golden retriever puppy as soon as possible.

Golden retriever puppy

(Photo by Chiemsee2016 | pixabay.com)

Golden retriever puppy training basics

It is not a secret that golden retrievers are among the smartest dog breeds. Their natural intelligence makes potty training easier for you. They are also extremely loyal and eager to please, so expect them to follow your instructions with a golden retriever’s brand of enthusiasm—charming and endearing. However, one should still keep in mind that your golden retriever does not exactly think (and follow instructions) like humans. There may be moments when your patience will be tested. Hang in there. Do not let your frustration show. Be calm and consistent. Also, always have little treats ready for when they do a great job. Do not be stingy with your praises, too. But also be reasonable when giving out these positive reinforcements.

Potty breaks

“Accidents” should be prevented from happening indoors. When this has been established early on, your golden retriever will be able to realize that the best place to pee or poop is outside. Bring your golden retriever puppy outside as often as possible until he is about eight weeks old. Also, make it a habit to bring your puppy outside first thing in the morning, 10 minutes after eating, and of course before bedtime. The more potty breaks your golden retriever is given, the higher your chances of housetraining them successfully.

Be predictable

Consistency is a major component of potty training. Take your puppy outside at the same time each day. Also, make sure to follow their feeding schedule to know when you will need to take your puppy outside. Another area that needs consistency is the place where your puppy will pee or poop. Bring him to the same corner all the time, passing through the same path and door. Soon enough, your golden retriever will pick up on this and will be able to relieve himself at the same spot.

Use a command

To avoid confusion on the part of your puppy, use a command to prompt him to potty. Use commands such as “go potty” or “bathroom” when you bring your golden retriever to the outdoor potty area. Give your dog a treat and a lot of praises when he urinates or defecates at your command. Eventually, your golden retriever will know what is expected of him whenever he hears this command. Be sure to be consistent with your command, saying it only once with an authoritative voice.

Take a deep breath

Accidents happen. Sometimes, even when potty training, your little puppy may have accidents indoors. There is no point in yelling at him because honestly he really would not understand you. Instead, clean up immediately, making sure not to leave traces of odor to keep him from remarking that same spot. Another way to avoid accidents is always to keep an eye on your golden retriever. Watch him, interact with him, and look out for signs suggesting that he needs to pee. If you catch your puppy peeing inside, clap your hands to startle him and bring him outside to his potty area immediately.

Vet visit

Your golden retriever is a naturally smart dog. It will not take long for them to form proper potty habits. However, if you notice a change or a recurrence of indoor accidents, you might want to schedule a visit to the vet. Golden retrievers are susceptible to urinary tract infections, causing frequent urination and indoor accidents. Loose stools may also be indicative of underlying gastrointestinal problems. A visit to the vet will help detect any possible issues as early as possible.

Overall, potty training a golden retriever puppy can be quite challenging. The good thing is you are blessed with a dog that is naturally intelligent and keen to please. Start potty training as soon as possible, and make it a priority. Of course, do not forget to be patient especially when accidents happen. Good luck!

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